Hard

Jun. 23rd, 2017 02:23 pm
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
Just talked to my ex-farrier.  He started out the conversation blustering about how the tenants at my barn wanted to have their horses trimmed every 6 weeks, not every 8 weeks (unnecessary in his opinion) and how they were obsessed with every chip in the hoof and so on.  I let him rant.  Finally I said; I don't believe I've ever told you how to trim my horse or interfered in any way.  He agreed that this was true. I then told him my observations and what we saw on the x-rays.  Along the way he explained to me exactly what he had been trying to accomplish.  I got big doses of his theories of hoof care.  I let him talk. He explained again to me that you have to leave extra hoof on barefoot trims.  He stated that he believed trimming the heel would make the horse lame.(!!!!!) 
Eventually he started halfway listening to what I was saying.  I repeated the: not flat or level idea over and over. I told him we took  At the end of the conversation, after he had apologized to me once, I said again: the x-rays showed her coffin bones nowhere near level, added that there was inflammation showing on the bone.  Repeated again that her left front coffin bone was tilting toward the sole.  At the very end of the conversation I said: My horse had a lot of hoof, a lot of hoof, she was trimmed exactly as you suggested is right. She wasn't sound she was lame, and not level side to side. Then I added the last fact, one I hadn't mentioned before because I had forgotten.  She has a huge amount of sidebone, on both sides in both feet.  She is 6. 
He sounded like a broken man when he said he was sorry again.

I felt really bad about leaving the conversation there, but SOMEBODY has to make this guy think about what he is doing.   I really hope this is a wake-up call for him.

Roman Holiday the Musical

Jun. 23rd, 2017 02:23 pm
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
Sunday we saw Roman Holiday.  The voices were very good, acting very good but, oh my, the story line; wait -- was there a story line?  There is a reason this show hasn't joined the great, and often repeated shows of history.  Which is a shame, since the production we saw was tantalizingly close to a really wonderful show.  Good tunes, good voices, good acting but something missing to make it great.

I wasn't sure I would make it to the theatre on Sunday, even just to sit and watch the show. Friday afternoon for perhaps the second time in 20+ years, I went home sick from work.  It might have been food poisoning, or some similar bug as I also missed the load out of Roman Holiday on Sunday evening. 

Today - the things

Jun. 23rd, 2017 08:45 pm
hunningham: Person sitting quietly on bus, contemplating life (man on bus)
[personal profile] hunningham
1) It has stopped being hot. This is good. It is so good. There is a cool breeze and I have had to go and shut windows and put on a jumper. I work from home, my house is cool (old, high ceilings, inadequate insulation) so I can cope with a heatwave, but oh, 30oC is a very bad temperature.

2) I have started coding an update for an open-source project on github. Also good. I have been meaning to this for a very long time. Today it was my displacement activity; I have another (big horrible) project which I really didn't feel up to, so it's my equivalent of scrubbing the floor under the fridge instead of revising for exams.

3) My period has started. Not so good. Pain and exhaustion. I feel as if I have been hit over the back of the head with a cartoon brick.

4) And now... I am going to have a hot bath, and then I am going to have some good whisky, and then I am going to bed with a book.

a man with an artic tern on his head

Jun. 23rd, 2017 08:12 pm
lamentables: (Default)
[personal profile] lamentables
Proper post with proper photos coming soon, but in the meantime: we went on a boat trip around the Farne Islands today. We saw amazing things, were dive-bombed by artic terns, and got thoroughly drenched. It was fabulous.

Man with an artic tern on his head #farneislands @abrinsky

birds and seals )

Invitation to the dance

Jun. 23rd, 2017 07:57 pm
oursin: Illustration from the Kipling story: mongoose on desk with inkwell and papers (mongoose)
[personal profile] oursin

Well, not literally.

But I have finally managed to have a discussion with the editor at the Very Estimable and Well-Reputed Academic Press whom I had hoped to get together with during the Massive Triennial Conference the other week, which did not happen for, reasons.

And they are very keen about a book I have been thinking about for ages, which is not the Major Research Project of the moment, though somewhat tangentially related, and I'm hmmmmmm about it.

Because it's a book where I haven't done more than research rather a small part of one angle of the bigger picture, but on the other hand, I do know what has to be in there and where to look.

And unlike the Major Research Project, which is large and contains multitudes, this would be a discrete project that wouldn't (I hope) keep starting yet more hares for me to go baying after.

*Wibble*

nanila: little and wicked (mizuno: lil naughty)
[personal profile] nanila
I’ll never understand the pride people take in saying, “I was born and bred here” or the use of the same phrase to defend one’s perceived superiority or deservingness of housing, health care or other basic human rights.

I mean, what did you, yourself, actually do to influence where you were born or bred? Unless you were a particularly ambitious embryo, the answer is “nothing”. Sure, your parents might have made some kind of effort to select your place of birth. Maybe they strove to move to better housing in a neighbourhood with better services and schools. Maybe they’re even immigrants, like my dad, and they struggled long and hard to learn their fourth language in order to integrate into their adopted country. But you? You didn’t do anything. Why are you so proud of that? Think of the things you've accomplished in your life. Isn't it far more fitting and fulfilling to be proud of those?

And why the obsession with asserting the superiority of a single identity over the others? “I’m English first and then British.” Pro-tip: Most of the rest of the world considers both of those to be synonymous with “ex-colonialist imperialist arsehole” so it doesn’t really matter which one you choose. ^.^

Here is a list of the geographically-linked identities that I consider myself able to lay claim to. I’m proud of some and not others.

  • American
  • British
  • European
  • Hawai’ian
  • Filipino
  • Olympian
  • Seattleite
  • Angeleno
  • San Diegan
  • Londoner
  • Brummie (this is a new one; still feels a little odd)


Today, I think I’m proudest of being European. I earned that identity and that passport, and I’m still very pissed off that some people want to take it away.

Today is also, weirdly, simultaneously:

  • the anniversary of Brexit, aka the Colossal Waste of Time and Money Foisted Upon Us by a Generation That Tore Down Decades of Painstakingly Won Goodwill with Our Neighbours and Won’t Live to Experience the Disastrous Consequences, Thanks a Lot, Dickheads.

    And

  • International Women in Engineering Day


So, to close this post, here is a peaceful photo of a woman doing some engineering.

Scientist at work

(no subject)

Jun. 23rd, 2017 10:32 am
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] bessemerprocess and [personal profile] libskrat!
chestnut_filly: (Default)
[personal profile] chestnut_filly posting in [community profile] amplificathon


Title: Most Tourists Suck, But I Guess You Don't
Author: [archiveofourown.org profile] Margo_Kim
Reader: [archiveofourown.org profile] Chestnut_filly
Fandom: Spirited Away and Lilo & Stitch
Pairing: Lilo/Chihiro
Rating: G
Summary: "It was a normal enough day at Nani’s cafe, except for the part where one girl nearly ripped the place apart looking for her mouse. That got Lilo’s attention."
Length: 11:53

Mediafire link

.
nanila: wrong side of the mirror (me: wrong side of the mirror)
[personal profile] nanila
I have been outrageously busy at work this week and I don't have the brain to string these together into a proper narrative. My apologies. So: Have a series of happy photos from the past week or so.

20170617_171856
[Keiki with freshly dug potatoes in his fist, ready to deposit them in one of the two white bowls in front of him.]

We ate our first potato harvest tonight. Yum!

+6 )

bingo card meme

Jun. 22nd, 2017 02:11 pm
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Personal bingo meme that people are playing on Twitter and elsewhere!

You can google "bingo card generator" and fill one out with your interests. Then you can use a photo editor to check off interests that you have too.

My card is also at Flickr:
https://flic.kr/p/VL1xcd

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 2.37.46 PM

transcription )
oursin: Photograph of a statue of Hygeia, goddess of health (Hygeia)
[personal profile] oursin
[R]ed tape also means regulations that protect citizens, at a certain cost to companies that otherwise have little incentive to sacrifice some profit to mitigate risk. It is because of red tape that you cannot buy a flammable sofa, and that you are very unlikely to die in an air crash.

Much red tape, indeed, is the frozen memory of past disaster. Modern regulatory regimes as a whole came into being in the late 19th and early 20th centuries because of public outrage at the dangerous practices of unrestrained industry.

This is perhaps partly similar to the phenomenon that having effective infrastructure and ongoing regular maintenance of same is not as dramatic a story as horrendous accidents.

It's possibly also analogous to people becoming anti-vaxxers, because vaccination programmes have been so successful that there is no notion of the risks there used to be from common diseases of childhood.

For the first few years of 'there were no new cases of polio in the last twelve months' this is news. And then that becomes the default setting.

For those who decry 'Elf and Safety, I recommend a salutary reading of the London Medical Officer of Health reports from the C19th, freely available digitised and searchable online.

There are some Victorian values one can get behind, and the rise of public health is one of them.

On other Victorian values, however, and those who ignore history are condemned to repeat it, this person seems unaware that providing tied housing contingent upon working for a particular employer is nothing like a 'welfare state':

it was recently reported that Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is spending is around $30m to provide short-term, prefab housing for 300 of its employees because Silicon Valley housing is in such short supply. Tech giants helped cause a housing crisis in Silicon Valley, now it seems they are becoming landlords. It’s feudalism 2.0.
Not so much feudalism as C19th model towns, e.g. Saltaire, founded by businessmen to keep their workers contented and (I hypothesise) spurning the trades union movement (having had to do with a late C19th enterprise with some of the same elements of benevolent paternalism towards the workforce).

And, looking at that article, was New Lanark really quite the same thing? Enlightened capitalism not quite the same as utopian socialism.

Also had the thought that people who are 'regulation BAD' seem to reverse this opinion when it comes to panic measures against terrorism that are often symbolic rather than proven efficacious.

(no subject)

Jun. 22nd, 2017 09:40 am
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] woldy!
hunningham: (Default)
[personal profile] hunningham
And because I haven't posted in ages, I keep on thinking that I need to do a great statement of All The Things, and give my (portentous) thoughts on The Election, The State of the Nation, The Fire and why we are living in the end times.

Can't cope with that. Really can't cope with that.

Instead here is a picture of my cat. He really has gone to sleep with his feet in the air. He's an ungainly beast.
Read more... )

[personal profile] sabotabby is focused

Jun. 22nd, 2017 09:01 am
rydra_wong: dreamsheep with spork and "SheepSpork" logo; no, it wouldn't make any more sense if you saw it  (dreamwidth -- sheepspork)
[personal profile] rydra_wong posting in [community profile] metaquotes
Possums and communism are basically my whole life.


Context is locked; QWP.

At least planes can take off here

Jun. 21st, 2017 06:37 pm
yourlibrarian: ComicScoobies-kate_angel (BUF-ComicScoobies-kate_angel)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian


1) We had a strange weather burst two days ago. The forecast had said possibility of some evening showers but clearly no bad weather was expected because when we turned on the weather radio they were saying skies were clear. Read more... )

2) NPR's 1A had an interesting chat about diversity and Disney productions, as well as the influence of media on kids.

3) I rather liked this discussion about the gendered history of pockets, although I notice it didn't mention the more recent push to get men out of cargo shorts into something more streamlined. This seems to me to strike at the heart of the issue which is that pressure about appearance has always been heaviest on women and this usually results in extreme, and often dangerous, impracticality when it comes to clothes.

"An 1899 New York Times piece makes the somewhat tongue-in-cheek claim that civilization itself is founded on pockets. "As we become more civilized, we need more pockets," the piece says, "No pocketless people has ever been great since pockets were invented, and the female sex cannot rival us while it is pocketless.""

4) HT to Petzi for pointing to the Television Critic's Awards nominees. I think these are frequently a much better list of nominees than the Emmys. That said, I thought a few choices were pretty odd. Read more... )

5) I posted about blockchains a few days ago and saw this discussion about a new project employing them as a new journalism model.

oursin: Photograph of small impressionistic metal figurine seated reading a book (Reader)
[personal profile] oursin

What I read

Finished Binti. Reminded me a bit of other things I have read over my sff reading life, but well-done, may well go for the next one.

Sarah Gailey, River of Teeth (2017). Okay, everybody mentions the hippos, but isn't it, underneath that, a combination western/caper tale where an unlikely team is brought together and has its own tensions besides the issues with what it has to do? (not that that isn't a good armature). Enjoyable, but ended abruptly and cliffhangingly, and is the new thing (see Binti above) of issuing novellas which are only the beginning of a longer story arc the new allotrope of serialised fiction? (but hey, it worked for Middlemarch, though at least Ms Evans indicated that it was an ongoing story.)

Dana Stabenow, Bad Blood (2013). Not quite as good as the last one I read, I think, but ended with A Thing that makes me want to go on to the next quite shortly to see how that pans out for Kate Shugak.

Two short pieces of Barbara Hambly's 'Further Adventures': Hazard (2017) (Sunwolf and Starhawk) and Elsewhere (2017) (Darwath).

Picked up in booksale, Arthur Ransome, Missee Lee (1941). I remembered very little about this, even though I later discovered I already had a copy on my shelves. I don't think it was ever among my favourites of the Swallows and Amazons books; but I've found, on re-reads of these books, that somehow they do not do for me what they did in youth - something about the style? I don't know. Also, early C20th rendering of Chinglish, sigh.

On the go

Elizabeth George, A Banquet of Consequences (2015). I was considerably off these when they were turning Lynley's Epic Manpain up to 11, but this one was very cheap in a charity shop and promised mostly Havers. And really, do we not want more of the scruffy maverick with constant disciplinary issues who is also a woman? - the 'top brass not pleased' is massive at the beginning of this one. Okay, it's got a standard E George riff on 'all unhappy families are different in baroquely complicated ways, and there are no happy families' (the misery handed on is not so much a coastal shelf as the Mariana Trench), but I have stuck with it, though have just been irked that over 500 pages into the narrative they are only just looking into how anyone might have got hold of the somewhat unusual toxic substance involved.

Also, on the ereader, because I don't want to tote around a damn great fat paperback, from the romance bundle, Ivory Lei, How to Wed an Earl (2013) - not got very far, but seems as, 'be betrothed in infancy by respective parents' is how...

Up next

Well, in another charity shop found the preceding volume by Elizabeth George, Just One Evil Act (2013), which, I daresay, will reveal what got Havers into the deepest of disgrace and quite possibly the depths of depression, but I'm not sure I really want to commit to going straight on to another of these. Or maybe the next Stabenow in the series.

Or I could look through my tbr piles, actual and virtual.

Somebody’s woke af.

Jun. 21st, 2017 11:01 am
nanila: wrong side of the mirror (me: wrong side of the mirror)
[personal profile] nanila
Humuhumu: “Keiki, are you a boy?”
Keiki: “No!”
Humuhumu: “Keiki, are you a girl?”
Keiki: “No!”
Humuhumu: “What are you, Keiki?”
Keiki: “I’m a KEI-KI.” syllables of name drawn out emphatically

20170620_194627
[Humuhumu and Keiki in the bath, giving themselves bubble beards.]

(no subject)

Jun. 21st, 2017 10:09 am
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] adrian_turtle!

Most Popular Tags

Page generated Jun. 24th, 2017 01:58 am